Projects

 

Alt-Text as Poetry Collaboration with Shannon Finnegan

Alt-text is an essential part of web accessibility, making visual content accessible to blind people and people with low vision. It is often overlooked altogether or understood through the lens of compliance, as an unwelcome burden to be met with minimum effort. How can we instead approach alt-text thoughtfully and creatively? This project reframes alt-text as a type of poetry and creates opportunities to practice writing it.


Places where Bojana has Presented Alt-Text as Poetry:

Online webinar for Leslie Lohman Museum in collaboration with Eyebeam, and NYU Grey Gallery 

BRIC

Eyebeam’s Digital Day Camp at SVA

Gallatin School of Individualized Study, NYU

Refiguring the Future, Knockdown Center Refiguring the Future.

Lincoln Center 

NYU Department of Media, Culture and Communication 

Crip Imponderabilia

The title of the show, “Crip Imponderabilia” takes it’s meaning from the repurposed word “cripple” and the anthropological word “imponderabilia”, which refers to all the mundane, almost invisible everyday actions of a culture. Each work will reflect this idea, but each work will be created with their own experience as a disabled person as well as how the work can be experienced by disabled and non disabled visitors.
This exhibit will be an example for Gallatin and other NYU galleries as to what can be done to make the gallery as accessible as possible to disabled people  but also how disability aesthetics/access can actually bring about innovation and a different way to disrupt the traditional art space. Treating the gallery experience as more of a process here we are exchanging ideas as well as a place where you could sit on the floor, move things around, touch, play games whenever is another way to break up how bodies usually operate in gallery spaces.

Technology Acquisition and Training

In the consulting industry, each situation is unique and requires a specific set of solutions. For this project, I helped my client define the ideal outcome for the situation, and through strategic planning we were able to achieve a great end result.

JC ADA 30 Festival

  

This was a virtual art centered celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) , produced by me, Bojana Coklyat! This festival focused on innovation, creativity and the relationships between people that make access happen and not necessarily the law itself. The focus was more about what has been possible since the signing of the law. The intention of this festival was to refigure the future of the arts in Jersey City in a way that truly engages everyone. This event impacted the planning of the 30th Jersey City Artist Studio tour. This is the first -year access has been a priority in the planning and implementation for this popular city-wide festival. I will be consulting on the virtual events and language for the registration form and other social media aspects. 

Events included ASL, captioning, audio description, and clear instructions on how to participate. 


Deconstructing Disability Art 

What is the difference between “disability art” and “disability and art”? In this panel discussion, we spent time getting to know disabled artists in the field of disability art. How does their way of experiencing the world inform their artistic practice? The purpose of this seminar was to explain that “Disability Art” is any art (theatre, fine art, film, writing, music or club) that takes disability as its theme or whose context relates to disability. Disability Art is an area of art where the content of the art takes on disability as its theme. Disability art is about exploring the conceptual ideas and physical realities of what it is like to be disabled concepts relating to the word.  "Disability and art" is art that is done by somebody who is disabled but is not formed by the concepts or aesthetics of disability. This panel also addressed subjects such as “inspiration porn” and why stories centering “the tragedy of disability” reinforce negative stereo-types. 

Disability Justice: New Frameworks for Organizing Access in Jersey City   

The ADA is an important civil rights law for disabled people, but it doesn’t ensure meaningful access. Meaningful inclusion and access only exist if organizations engage in disability justice. Disability Justice is a framework that examines disability and ableism as it relates to other forms of oppression and identity (race, class, gender, sexuality, citizenship, incarceration, size, etc.). It was developed starting in 2005 by the Disability Justice collective, a group of black, brown, queer, and trans people including Patty Berne, Mia Mingus, Stacey Milbern, Leroy F. Moore Jr., Eli Claire and Sebastian Margaret. We discussed ways arts organizations can implement “open access” and open up conversations regarding these topics. Our panel will include cultural producers, cultural organizers, and various members from the disability community. 

Golden Door Film Festival Screening 

 Twelve short films centering disability and concepts associated with disability were screened. This screening featured films where disability experience is an integral part of the creative process, used to tell new stories. 

Alt-Text as Poetry Workshop  

Alt-text is an essential part of web accessibility, making visual content accessible to blind people and people with low vision. It is often overlooked altogether or understood through the lens of compliance, as an unwelcome burden to be met with minimum effort. How can we instead approach alt-text thoughtfully and creatively? This project reframed alt-text as a type of poetry and created opportunities to practice writing it. This project has been featured in Hyperallergic, Art in America and Art News. 

Crip Camp Watch Party and Discussion hosted by Art House Productions 

“Down the road from Woodstock, a revolution blossomed at a ramshackle summer camp for teenagers with disabilities, transforming their lives and igniting a landmark movement.” After the movie, a panel consisting of local disabled advocates/activists, artists and leaders in the Jersey City Art community discussed how this movement currently affects our lives and what we can do to expand places where disabled people want to be.

  


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